GSM visas – State/Territory nomination update

Uglobal – We would like to thank Mark Welch for his contribution ..

We would like to thank Mark Welch for his contributions to the article “Why cryptocurrency is not widely used in the RCBI world, yet”

If you would like to discuss cryptocurrency and/or  Australian investor visas please Contact Us

  • Office: +44  (0)800772 0570
  • Mobile: + 44  (0)7710 649194
  • Email:  mark@cargilmigration.com

 

Cryptocurrency in the investor & business visas world … Uglobal Immigration magazine

Uglobal Immigration magazine 

Recently we shared some comments we made to Uglobal Immigration magazine about visa options for same sex partners.

We have again been asked to provide comments. This time with regards to cryptocurrency in investor visas. Our response was recently published in an article on the Uglobal Immigration website.

Mark Welch, who is the founder of Australian law firm Cargil Migration, said that based on his recent conversations with the Australian Department of Home Affairs (DHA) officials, he can confirm that digital currencies are excluded as a source of funds or assets, and therefore, could not be used for investment immigration.

“The DHA is unable to track digital currencies and, therefore, verify that the funds are lawful. Any funds which cannot be confirmed as lawful, can’t be considered in the Business Innovation and Investment visas,” Welch said.

If you would like to discuss cryptocurrency and what assets are eligible for Australian investor or business visas please Contact Us

  • Office: +44  (0)800772 0570
  • Mobile: + 44  (0)7710 649194
  • Email:  mark@cargilmigration.com

 

SkillSelect EOI invitations – 26 July 2021

Invitation Round: 26 July 2021

The number of invitations issued:

  • Skilled Independent Subclass 189 visa: 500 invitations
  • Skilled Work Regional Subclass 491 visa-Family sponsored: 250 invitations

Minimum points score:

  • Skilled Independent Subclass 189 visa: 80
  • Skilled Work Regional Subclass 491 visa – Family sponsored: 65

Invitations issued during 2021-22 program year

Visa subclass Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Total
Skilled Independent visa (subclass 189) 250 250
Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa (subclass 491) – Family Sponsored 500 500
Total 750

 

If you want to discuss the above, your current visa application or your visa options going forward please Contact Us.

  • Office: +44  (0)800772 0570
  • Mobile: + 44  (0)7710 649194
  • Email:  mark@cargilmigration.com

 

 

Global visa options for same-sex couples … Uglobal Immigration magazine

Uglobal Immigration magazine

It’s always great to be able to contribute to leading industry magazines & forums.

We were recently asked to provide comment on Australia’s recognition of same sex partners for investor visas. Our response was recently published in an ARTICLE on the Uglobal Immigration website.

Mark Welch, another Registered Migration Agent from Australia who founded the law firm Cargil Migration, added that same-sex applicants have to provide “evidence that the relationship is mutually exclusive, and is genuine and continuing. Evidence can include financial aspects, nature of the household, social aspects of the relationship and the nature of your commitment.”

If you would like to discuss the recognition of your same-sex relationship for Australian visas, investor or otherwise, please Contact Us

  • Office: +44  (0)800772 0570
  • Mobile: + 44  (0)7710 649194
  • Email:  mark@cargilmigration.com

The Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Launching a Successful Startup

Guide to launching a successful start up

Young Entrepreneurs

The Young Entrepreneur’s Guide to Launching a Successful Startup

Today, young people have endless options when it comes to their future careers. If the idea of securing a 9-to-5 job doesn’t appeal to you but you love to think on your feet and come up with unique solutions to problems, entrepreneurship might be your style. 

If you’ve already got a great business idea but you’re just not sure how to turn it into a viable company, these tips will help you with everything from determining your budget to hiring freelancers for support. This article, courtesy of Cargil Migration, is just one of the many great resources you can find on the Cargil Migration blog.  

Find a Mentor

As you get ready to begin your entrepreneurial journey, you’ll probably find that you have a lot of questions about how to get started. This is why it’s crucial for young entrepreneurs to seek out business mentors. To find a mentor who can help guide you, Find My Shift suggests reaching out to friends, acquaintances, and people in your professional network first. Think about who you’ve met through school, part-time jobs, or volunteering, and contact people who have expertise in the field you’re entering. 

Create a Business Plan

You may have jotted down a few notes about your business idea, but with the help of your mentor, you can create a thorough business plan. This is especially important if you plan to seek funding from outside sources. Startup Donut states that you’ll need to conduct market research first, and then begin detailing your products and services, target customers, operations, and plans for the future. 

Initial Funding

You should include basic details about your potential budget in your business plan, but you should also create an in-depth business budget with information about your sources of income, estimations of your expenses, and even your sales cycles. You’ll definitely need this if you plan to seek funding in addition to your personal savings! You may be able to apply for a small business loan, turn to crowdfunding, win a small business grant, or join a business incubator. 

Hire Freelancers

Right now, you may not have the funds necessary to bring on full-time employees, but that doesn’t mean you have to handle every aspect of running your business by yourself. Hiring freelancers is a great way to delegate tasks without stretching your budget. You can find freelancers offering a wide variety of services on online job boards. Whether you need a web developer, a blog content creator, an IT support expert, a sales associate, or an administrative assistant, you can find a freelancer to get the job done. 

Marketing and Execution

You’ve gotten your funding, you have a small team of freelancers, and with guidance from your mentor, you’re ready to take your business plan and turn it into a functioning operation. Now it’s time to begin marketing your products and services so that you can land your very first customers or clients! Having a freelance web designer or social media manager on your team will make this stage much easier. Once you’ve started selling, your customers and clients can refer others to your business, helping you boost your revenue.

As a young entrepreneur with a big idea, you may have a lot to learn about business, but your innovative and creative attitude will serve you well in the startup world. Don’t hesitate to go after your entrepreneurial goals! With these tips, you’ll be prepared to turn your startup into a success. 

Whether you’re an entrepreneur or employee migrating to Australia, you may need assistance with the visa process. Cargil Migration will help you every step of the way! Call 0800-772-0570 for information about your options and eligibility.

Photo via Pexels

Australian visa program update – October 2020

Australia confirms commitment to permanent migration for the 2020 to 2021 financial year

In early October the Australian government announced their federal budget for the 2020-2021 financial year. 

On the back of the budget the DHA (Department of Home Affairs) outlined details for their permanent migration program. The below is an overview of these changes.

Migration program focus 

The government announced, due to the COVID pandemic, that the focus of the migration program for 2020-2021 is “on supporting our economic recovery, growing Australian businesses and creating jobs for Australians”.  

Migration program numbers 

The DHA confirmed the permanent migration program numbers will remain at a cap of 160,000. This includes: 

  • 79,600 places in the Skilled stream 
  • 77,300 places in the Family stream. 
  • 3,100 in the Child and Special Eligibility visas

The government anticipate that two thirds of the visas will be allocated to people in Australia.

The remaining visas will then likely be split between the skill stream (two thirds) and the family Stream (one third). 

Migration program – Skilled visas 

A key target of the skilled visa program will be innovators, investors and job creators. They will be encouraged to apply through the Global Talent, Business Innovation and Investment Program (BIIP) and Employer Sponsored Visas. 

Global Talent Visa – places tripled 

A particular focus will be the Global Talent Independent (GTI) Visa. The program for the new financial year will triple from 5,000 to 15,000 places. The target of this visa will be individuals in industries such as:

  • AgTech
  • Space and Advanced Manufacturing
  • FinTech
  • Energy and Mining Technology
  • MedTech
  • Cyber Security
  • Quantum Information, Advanced Digital, Data Science and ICT
Business Investors – places almost doubled 

The DHA have confirmed that they will double the number of places available for business investors to 13,500 places. The BIIP program will be streamlined and there will be changes to investment and residency requirements, ensuring the program is targeted at Australian venture capitals and emerging small and medium size businesses to support the economic recovery. 

As of publishing this update, we are still awaiting on further details of the changes to be announced. 

GSM Program – skilled migration remains open 

Individuals and their family members can still look to submit an EOI for the GSM program. This includes the Skilled Independent visa  (Subclass 189) and the two State/territory nominated (Subclass 190 & 491) visas . 

Subclass 189 – Skilled Independent visa

At present the DHA have announced that the focus on the Subclass 189 invitations  will be on those occupations listed on the Priority Migration Skilled Occupation List  (PMSOL). 

It is expected that the required points are likely to remain high. However the 11th October invitation details are yet be released.

State/Territory nominated visas – Subclass 190 & Subclass 491 

The opportunity to be nominated for either of the state/territory nominated GSM visas will remain. At the time of writing, the majority of the states/territories have programs in place to allocate nominations to eligible onshore applicants.  

For offshore applicants, we are still waiting on the states to confirm their program. These are likely to be released in the weeks and months leading up to Christmas. For example:

  • South Australia have pushed back the release of their lists from mid-October to November.
  • NSW  have also confirmed that they will announce changes to the management of the Skilled Work Regional Visa (subclass 491) in due course.
  • Queensland have stated that they plan to re-open the program in December 2020.

Migration Program – Family stream

The majority of visas within the Family stream will go to partners, with almost double the places (72.300) compared to the previous financial year. The aim to give more certainty to those wanting to settle in Australia with their partners and plan for their futures. 

Humanitarian Program

The DHA have confirmed their commitment to a Humanitarian Program. A cap of  13,750 places, similar to last year. In numbers, Australia remains the third most generous humanitarian resettlement country in the world.

 

If you want to discuss how you are effected, your current visa application or your visa options going forward please Contact Us

  • Office: +44  (0)800772 0570
  • Mobile: + 44  (0)7710 649194
  • Email:  mark@cargilmigration.com

UPDATE: Australian Business & Investor visa programs – July 2020

UPDATE: Business & Investor visa visa program – July 2020 

As with the General Skilled Migration (GSM) program the business and investor program is currently being reviewed by the DHA. It is expected that it will re-open in the coming weeks & months.

At the stage it there have been no changes announced to the visas themselves, just when the program will reopen. If you are interested in knowing what your business or investor visa options are please get in touch.

We can still provide visa options, discuss your plans, confirm what is required by applicants, introduce you to our partners, (eg. VC ensure Capital providers) and look to prepare submissions upon re-opening of the visa program.

An overview of the states/territories nomination status as of now is below:

ACT – The ACT nomination program is currently suspended.  Any submitted applications will not be processed until further notice. 

NEW SOUTH WALES – NSW is currently closed to applications for nomination under the Business Innovation and Investment Program (BIIP). NSW will open to new nominations once the DHA provides NSW with an allocation of positions for 2020-21

NORTHERN TERRITORY – At this stage all Business Investment and Innovation Program nomination applications will continue to be accepted and assessed, but no nominations can be issued until the Northern Territory has been allocated quotas.

QUEENSLAND  – The business migration program will remain closed until further notice. Please note:  BSMQ are not accepting any Expressions of Interests and look forward to opening the business program as soon as is possible.

TASMANIA – The Tasmanian Business Nomination Program is currently being reviewed. Tasmania have confirmed with us that they hope to have this review completed and new requirements published by the end of August 2020.

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

Business Migration programs are scheduled to re-open from early August. This will be dependent on the Commonwealth Government’s allocation of state nomination places for program year 2020-21. 

VICTORIA 

The Victorian Government’s state nomination program will remain temporarily closed while we await the Commonwealth Government’s allocation of state nomination places for 2020-21.

WESTERN AUSTRALIA – All State nomination places from the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) for Western Australia have now been allocated. They are not accepting any new applications for subclasses 188 or 132 until further notice.

If you want to discuss how you are effected, your current visa application or your visa options going forward please Contact Us

  • Office: +44 (0)800772 0570
  • Mobile: + 44 (0)7710 649194
  • Email: mark@cargilmigration.com

 

Australian temporary visa holder changes – 4 April, 2020

Updated Australian immigration policy

In response to COVID-19 the DHA have announced further policy changes to visa holders currently in Australia. These changes effect:

  • New Zealand Citizens on Subclass 444 visas
  • Visitor visa changes
  • International students
  • Temporary Skilled visa holders
  • Working Holiday Makers
  • Access to Superannuation

The statement from the DHA is below. If you want to discuss how this effects you, please Contact Us.

Saturday, 04 April 2020

Coronavirus and Temporary Visa holders

The Government is making a number of changes to temporary visa holder arrangements during the coronavirus crisis in order to protect the health and livelihoods of Australians, support critical industries, and assist with the rapid recovery post the virus.There are 2.17 million people presently in Australia on a temporary visa.All were welcomed to Australia on a temporary basis for different reasons including to fill skills shortages; to study as full fee-paying international students; to visit family and friends; or to work and holiday.They are an important part of our economy and society. For example, there are over 8,000 skilled medical professionals on temporary visas supporting our health system right now.While citizens, permanent residents and many New Zealanders have access to unconditional work rights and government payments (including the new JobKeeper and JobSeeker payments), temporary visa holders do not.There has always been an expectation that temporary visa holders are able to support themselves while in Australia.  The changes announced today will help facilitate this for those who may be stood down or lose work hours as a result of the coronavirus. In line with changes being made for Australian citizens and permanent residents, most temporary visa holders with work rights will now be able to access their Australian superannuation to help support themselves during this crisis.  Temporary visa holders who are unable to support themselves under these arrangements over the next six months are strongly encouraged to return home. For these individuals it’s time to go home, and they should make arrangements as quickly as possible.Changes are also geared toward enabling temporary visa holders to remain in key industries, such as health, aged and disability care, agriculture and food processing. Importantly, they can help boost front line health numbers, get food from farms to our shops and ensure critical services continue.Temporary visa holders are extremely valuable to the Australian economy and way of life, but the reality is that many Australians will find themselves out of work due to the dual health and economic crisis we’re currently facing, and these Australians and permanent residents must be the Government’s number one focus.Visa changesThe following new measures will apply to the major classes of temporary visa holders. The situation will be reviewed periodically and further changes made if required.Visitor visa holdersThere are 203,000 international visitors in Australia, typically on a visa lasting three months or less.International tourists should return to their home country as quickly as possible, particularly those without family support.Thousands are already doing this and others should follow their lead.International students There are 565,000 international students in Australia, mainly studying in the higher education or vocational education sector. They are an important contributor to our tertiary sector and economy, supporting 240,000 Australian jobs.Students are encouraged to rely on family support, part-time work where available and their own savings to sustain themselves in Australia.  As part of their visa application, international students have had to demonstrate that they can support themselves completely in their first year.Students who have been here longer than 12 months who find themselves in financial hardship will be able to access their Australian superannuation.The Government will undertake further engagement with the international education sector who already provide some financial support for international students facing hardship. For example, we understand there are some education providers that are providing fee discounts to international students.The Government will also be flexible in cases where Coronavirus has prevented international students meeting their visa conditions (such as not being able attend classes).International students are able to work up to 40 hours per fortnight.International students working in aged care and as nurses have had these hours extended to support these critical sectors.International students working in the major supermarkets had also had these hours extended to help get stock on shelves during the high demand. From 1 May, their hours will return to the maximum 40 hours a fortnight as more Australians are being recruited into these roles.New Zealanders on 444 visasNew Zealanders and Australians have reciprocal arrangements whereby we can each stay and work in each other’s country. There are more than 672,000 New Zealanders in Australia on a subclass 444 visa.New Zealanders who are on 444 visas and arrived before 26 February 2001 will have access to welfare payments and the JobKeeper payment.444 visa holders who arrived after 2001 have access to the JobKeeper payment. Those who have lived in Australia for 10 years or more have access to JobSeeker payments for six months.New Zealanders should consider returning to New Zealand if they are unable to support themselves through these provisions, work or family support.Temporary Skilled visa holders There are around 139,000 temporary skilled visa holders, on either a 2 year or 4 year visa.  They were provided the visa to fill a skills shortage – a shortage that may still be present when the crisis has passed.Consequently, those visa holders who have been stood down, but not laid off, will maintain their visa validity and businesses will have the opportunity to extend their visa as per normal arrangements.  Businesses will also be able to reduce the hours of the visa holder without the person being in breach of their visa condition.These visa holders will also be able to access up to $10,000 of their superannuation this financial year.Those visa holders who have been laid off due to coronavirus should leave the country in line with existing visa conditions if they are unable to secure a new sponsor.  However, should a 4-year visa holder be re-employed after the coronavirus pandemic, their time already spent in Australia will count towards their permanent residency skilled work experience requirements.Working holiday makers supporting critical sectors There are about 118,000 people in Australia on a Working Holiday visa (or backpacker visa) – a visa which provides conditional work rights.To support the critical sectors of heath, aged and disability care, agriculture and food processing, and childcare, some limited flexibility will be provided.In particular, working holiday makers who are working in these critical sectors will be exempt from the six month work limitation with the one employer and eligible for a further visa to keep working in these critical sectors if their current visa is due to expire in the next six months.In general, working holiday makers that do not have the confidence to sustain themselves over the next six months should make arrangements to leave the country.There are another 185,000 other temporary visa holders in Australia, about half of them temporary graduate visa holders. They will also be able to access their Australian superannuation if needed for support.Further announcements will be made with the Deputy Prime Minister and Agriculture Minister in relation to supporting the agricultural sector, including the operation of the Seasonal Worker Program and Pacific Labour Scheme. 

https://minister.homeaffairs.gov.au/davidcoleman/Pages/Coronavirus-and-Temporary-Visa-holders.aspx