Australian immigration changes – new visas and their impact on Australian immigration

The Temporary Skilled Shortage (TSS) visa (Subclass 482), the effect on GSM visas and the Global Talent Visa scheme

A lot has been happening in Australian immigration in 2018. It has started with the skilled list for the Subclass 189 being amended. Some of the states & territories followed and their Subclass 190 & 489 visas have consequently been effected.

Most significant of all is that as fo 18th March, 2018 the Temporary Work (Skilled) Subclass 457 visa has been replaced by the  Temporary Skilled Shortage (TSS) visa (Subclass 482).

The changes and differences between the Subclass 457 & Subclass 482 are significant. We wont attempt to address them all here but will highlight some key points and how these changes may effect your plans and reinforce the importance of the General Skilled Migration (GSM) visa program.

GSM Visa program

The GSM program has remained intact. It significance is shown by the figures below:

  1.  Subclass 189: 176 occupations remain eligible for this visa
  2. Subclass 190: 416 skilled occupations remain eligible for this visa program
  3.  Subclass 489:
    • 475 skilled occupations remain eligible for the State Territory nominated 489 visa program OR
    • 176 occupations remain eligible for the Family Nominated 489 visa programme

Temporary Employer sponsored visas – new Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa (subclass 482) 

As mentioned the temporary Employer Sponsored visa (Subclass 457) has been replaced by the Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa (subclass 482).

Whilst the Subclass 457 could be granted up to 4 years, the Subclass 482 visas can vary:

  1. Short term – up to 2 years if the occupation is on Short Term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)
  2. Medium term – up to 4 years if on Medium Long Term Skilled Shortages List (MLTSSL) and a new Regional Occupation List (ROL)
  3. Labour Agreement Stream – this is where an employer has negotiated visa arrangements with the Department of Home Affairs (formerly the DIBP Department of Immigration & B0order Patrol).

Applicant requirements:

  • Work experience – Applicants must have a minimum of 2 years
  • English Language – Applicants must meet minimum english language requirements. e.g For an IELTS test they must score 5 overall, but have a minimum score of at least 4.5 on each component
  • Police clearances – Mandatory police clearances.

Sponsor/Employers:

  • Labour-market testing is required (e.g prescribed advertising standards must be met by the employer)
  • Applicant must be nominated in one of the 509 skilled occupations, unless the negotiated Labour Agreement allows otherwise.

Transitional arrangements – Individuals who are already in Australia on a Subclass 457 visa and need to renew this visa or apply for another visa (such as the Subclass 482 or a permanent visa – see below) will need to check with their employer or Migration Agent what their options are. 

Permanent Employer Sponsored visa – Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) Subclass 186 visa & Regional Skilled Migration Scheme (RSMS) Subclass 187 visa

  • Applicants must be under 45
  • Applicants must have worked in Australia for 3 years (it was 2 years) on a 457 visa or 482 visa OR have undertaken a skills assessment under the Direct Entry Scheme
  • Applicants must have at least 3 years work experience
  • Applicants occupation must be on the:
    • MLTSSL for Subclass 186 visas (208 occupations)
    • MLTSSL or ROL list for Subclass 187 (673 occupations)

What are the key takeaways about these changes?

  •  It is more difficult to obtain a visa for Australia under both employer nomination schemes –  temporary and permanent residence. e.g Labour Market testing is required for almost all applications under the TSS visa. This wasn’t the case previously.
  • Students hoping to transfer onto an employer sponsored visa must have at least 2 years experience in the occupation for a temporary visa, or 3 years for a permanent employer visa.
  • Skilled applicants wanting to obtain permanent residency need to be under 45 years – unless some very limited exemptions are met.
  • If an applicant or their spouse is eligible for a GSM visa – 189/190/489 – then it is likely to be their best long term option to migrate to Australia permanently

Final comments

These changes have been a long time coming and even before the details were laid out, they have been widely criticised by the business community. They see this as as a significant disadvantage to recruiting, employing and incentivising skilled migrants to fill positions in Australia.

With this is mind, employers will be forced to look closer at the Australia employment market to fill their workforce needs. This will advantage applicants who hold a GSM visa or intend to apply for a GSM visa.

Global Talent Scheme 

In addition to the above there will be further changes to the Australian immigration program. The Department of Home Affairs have flagged a new scheme known as the Global Talent Scheme. This is a  pilot programme aimed at attracting high-income employees and tech specialists.  It is hoped it will alleviate some of the concerns from employers in Australia that they will miss out of skills need to grow their business due to the restrictions in the new Subclass 482 visa.

It will allow eligible established business and start-up companies seeking talent in STEM fields like biomedicine and agricultural technology to sponsor foreign nationals on a temporary residency basis, as well as offering a pathway to permanent residency. The scheme is due to commence on 1st July. As details emerge we will release them here.

 

If you would like to discuss your options – whether you would be eligible –  then please  Contact Us.

 

NSW Skilled Occupation List (SOL) update

The NSW Department of Industry have updated their Skilled Occupation Lists (SOL) effective immediately (25th September, 2017). This update includes both the addition and removal of some occupations.

Applicants seeking to nominated by NSW for a Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) visa or Skilled Regional (Provisional) (Subclass 489) visa will need to have an occupation on their skilled occupations lists.

NSW – The Premier state

Some of these occupations are able to be nominated under both visa programs, whilst many are also listed for nomination in specific regions of NSW for the Subclass 489 visa.

Occupations added:

  • Chemical Engineer (233111)
  • Electronics Engineer (233411)
  • Industrial Engineer (233511)
  • Production or Plant Engineer (233513)
  • ICT Security Specialist (262112)
  • Architectural Draftsperson (312111)
  • Stonemason (331112)

Occupations removed:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Adviser (251312)
  • Cardiothoracic Surgeon (253512)
  • Neurosurgeon (252513)

The full list of occupations can be found here – Skilled Occupations (2017-18).

If you would like to discuss your options for a NSW nominated visa – whether you would be eligible for the Subclass 190 or 489 visa. then please  Contact Us.

Engineers Australia – skills assessment update

Engineers Australia (EA) have announced a number of changes and updates recently. The below summarises these.

English Language tests – PTE Academic 

From November 1st, 2017 skills assessment applicants can use PTE Academic test results to evidence their english language ability. Until this date only IELTS exams are accepted.

The minimum requirement for an applicant who undertakes the PTE Academic test is a score of 50 in each of the 4 modules – Listening, Writing, Reading and Speaking.

Washington Accord addition – another country added  

Pakistan has been added to the list of approved countries under the Washington Accord. This means that qualifications completed from 2017 onwards will be accepted by Engineers Australia.

This brings the number of signatory countries to the Washington Accord to 19. These include:

* Australia * Canada * China * Chinese Taipei * Hong Kong * India *  Ireland * Japan * Korea * Malaysia * New Zealand * Russia * Singapore *  South Africa * Sri Lanka * Turkey * United States * United Kingdom * Pakistan

Skilled Migration

Engineering Registration Overseas 

If an applicant for a skills Assessment has been practicing in a country where Engineering is a regulated profession, such as Pakistan or the Philippines, they  must include evidence of registration in the application.

Processing Times 

The current waiting times skills assessments applications are:

  • Australian Qualifications And Accords Qualifications Assessment: 6 weeks
  • Australian Qualifications And Accords Qualifications Assessment with Fast Track: 15 working days
  • Competency Demonstration Report: 6 weeks
  • Competency Demonstration Report with Fast Track: 15 working days

If you have any questions about how this effects you eligibility and your visa options please Contact Us.

General Skilled Migration (GSM): 2017-18 skilled occupations lists

Australia skilled visas – ACT occupations from July 2017

ACT skilled occupation list – how long will they last this year?

The ACT have announced their skilled occupation list for 2017-2018. The ACT occupation list is only for the Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) visa.

Unlike other states or territories The ACT do not nominate applicants for the alternate state/territory nominated Skilled Regional (Provisional) (Subclass 489) Visa.  This visa is a temporary residents visa. It is commonly acknowledged to be an inferior visa to the Subclass 190 visa.

 

ACT Migration

Migrate to Canberra

Some surprise occupations 

Added to the ACT list, and not seen on any other state/territory lists, are the following:

  • Copywriter
  • Newspaper or Periodical Editor
  • Print Journalist
  • Technical Writer
  • Television Journalist
  • Journalists and other writers

In addition the following can also be nominated:

  • Public Relations Professionals

Is time ticking…..

If your occupation is listed, and you are keen to apply, then the advice is to get onto it. In the last financial year, 2016 to 2017, the occupation list was only open for a few weeks before it was closed.

What occupations are on the 2017-18 list?

OCCUPATIONS
Architect
Audiologist
Careers Counsellor
Chef
Civil Engineer
Clinical Psychologist
Copywriter
Corporate Services Manager
Counsellors (nec)
Diesel Motor Mechanic
Drug & Alcohol Counsellor
Early Childhood (Pre-Primary School) Teacher
Educational Psychologist
Electrical Engineer
Electronics Engineer
Family & Marriage Counsellor
General Practitioner
Geotechnical Engineer
Graphic Designer
Hairdresser
Illustrator
Industrial Engineer
Journalist & other writers (nec)
Landscape Architect
Mechanical Engineer
Medical Diagnostic Radiographer
Medical Radiation Therapist
Motor Mechanic (General)
Motorcycle Mechanic
Newspaper or Periodical Editor
Nuclear Medicine Technologist
Nurse Manager
Nurse Practitioner
Nursing Clinical Director
Occupational Therapist
Optometrist
Organisational Psychologist
Orthopist
Physiotherapist
Primary Health Organisation Manager
Print Journalist
Psychologists (nec)
Public Relations Professional
Quantity Surveyor
Recreation Officer
Registered Nurse (Aged Care)
Registered Nurse (Child & Family Health)
Registered Nurse (Community Health)
Registered Nurse (Critical Care & Emergency)
Registered Nurse (Developmental Disability)
Registered Nurse (Disability & Rehabilitation)
Registered Nurse (Medical Practice)
Registered Nurse (Medical)
Registered Nurse (Mental Health)
Registered Nurse (Paediatrics)
Registered Nurse (Perioperative)
Registered Nurse (Surgical)
Registered Nurses (nec)
Rehabilitation Counsellor
Resident Medical Officer
Retail Pharmacist
Small Engine Mechanic
Social Professionals (nec)
Social Worker
Solicitor
Sonographer
Speech Pathologist
Structural Engineer
Student Counsellor
Technical Writer
Television Journalist
Transport Engineer
Web Designer
Welfare Centre Manager
Welfare Worker

If you would like to discuss your options then please Contact Us.

Australian skilled visas – Removed occupations from 1st July 2017

List of removed occupations

In the first of a number of blogs posts discussing the 1st July 2017 changes, please see below details of the occupations removed as an eligible skilled occupation.

Skilled Migration

Occupations entirely removed from the list of eligible skilled occupations on 1 July 2017 are listed below. Nine of these were eligible for 457 and 186 visas on 19 April 2017.

Equipment Hire Manager^149915
Fleet Manager^149411
Picture Framer^394212
Property Manager^612112
Psychotherapist^272314
Real Estate Agent Principal^612113
Real Estate Agent^612114
Real Estate Agent Representative^612115
Ship’s Engineer231212
Ship’s Master231213
Ship’s Officer231214
University Tutor^242112

If this affects your eligibility, and you would like to discuss if have alternative options then please Contact Us.

 

Australian visa fees to increase as of 1st July, 2017

The Australian treasure Scott Morrison, in the annual budget last week, has announced that as of 1st July, 2017 all Australian visa application fees will increase.

The fees will increase in line with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and be rounded to the nearest $5. The increases for the common visas that we deal with at Cargil Migration are below (all in AUD):

Business skills

  • Business Innovation Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor E Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Business Talent (Subclass 132) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $6,990 –> $7,130
    • Adult Dependent increase from $3,495 –> $3,565
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,745 –> $1,780

Work (Skilled) – Subclass 457 program (due to close in March 2018)

  • Subclass 457 visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $1,060 –> $1,180
    • Adult Dependent increase from $1,060 –> $1,080
    • Child Dependent increase from $265 –> $270

Other temporary work visas

The temporary work visas include:

  1. Temporary Work  Short Stay Specialist (Subclass 400) visa
  2. Temporary Work Domestic Worker (Subclass 403) visa
  3. Temporary Work Foreign Government (Subclass 403) visa
  4. Temporary Work Government Agreement (Subclass 400) visa
  5. Temporary Work Seasonal Worker (Subclass 403) visa
  6. Temporary Activity Visa All Streams (Subclass 408) visa

The increase across all three listed visas are:

  • Primary Applicant increase from $275 –> $280
  • Adult Dependent where applicable increase from $275 –> $280
  • Child Dependent where applicable $70 (no change)

Student visas

  • Student visa (Subclass 500) –
    • Primary Applicant increases from $550 –> $560
    • Adult Dependent increases from $410 –> $420
    • Child Dependent increase from $135 –> $140

Partner & Prospective Spouse visas

  • Partner Visa (Subclass 309/100) – Primary Applicant increases from $6,865 –> $7,000
  • Partner Visa (Subclass 820/801) – Primary Applicant increase from $6,865 –> $7,000
  • Prospective Spouse (Subclass 300) – Primary Applicant increase from $6,865 –> $7,000
  • Partner Visa (820/801) if a holder of Subclass 300 visa – Primary Applicant increase from $1,145 –> $ 1,170

Child visa

  • Child Visa (Subclass 101 & 802) – Primary Applicant increase from $2,370 to $2,415

General Skilled Migration (GSM) visas

The GSM Visas include:

  1. Skilled Independent (Subclass 189) visa
  2. Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) visa
  3. Skilled Regional (Subclass 489) visa

The increase across all three listed visas are:

  • Primary Applicant increase from $3,600 –> $3,670
  • Adult Dependent increase from $1,800 –> $1,835
  • Child Dependent increase from $900 –> $920

Resident Return visas

  • Subclass 155 & 157 Primary Applicant increases from $360 –> $365
  • Subclass 159 Provisional Resident Return
    • Primary Applicant increases from $185 –> $190
    • Adult Dependent $95 (no change)
    • Child Dependent $45 (no change)

If you have any queries please contact us. These fees are suggested and are subject to change. If the visa you are applying for is not listed please get in touch and we can provide further information.

Western Australia Skilled migration occupation list (WASMOL) – due to be updated late May 2017

As detailed in a previous post the Western Australian skilled migration occupation list (WASMOL) is currently operating under an interim list. The list includes only medical and health care occupations.

If your occupation is on this list you may be considered for the Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) Visa and the Skilled Regional (Provisional) (Subclass 489) Visa. As a starting point however, you should look at whether you are eligible for a Skilled Independent (Subclass 189) visa.

As soon as we become aware of these changes we will publish them here and share them via Twitter.

If you would like to discuss your options, for Western Australia or anywhere else, or you have any questions please get in touch.

 

Changes to Subclass 457 visas, occupation lists and GSM visas

Immediate changes to South Australian skilled migration

The changes are coming frequently in Australian skilled migration. South Australia have today announced some significant changes to their skilled nomination list, in particular their high points nomination. The copy from the announcement is below.

South Australia – skilled migration

High points nomination

From 9am (Australian Central Standard Time) on 19 April 2017 the requirement for high points nomination will increase from 80 to 85 points.

This change is in response to the overall quota being achieved under the existing 80 points requirement.

This change will not affect applications lodged prior to this time. Applications for high points nomination received after this time will be refused if they do not meet the 85 points requirement.

High points and chain migration exclusions

Effective immediately the following occupations on the Supplementary Skilled List are no longer available for high points or chain migration nomination:

221111 Accountant (General)
223111 Human Resource Adviser (not available for high points since 02/09/2016)
225113 Marketing Specialist
225412 Sales Representative (Medical and Pharmaceutical Products)
242111 University Lecturer
242112 University Tutor
251511 Hospital Pharmacist
251513 Retail Pharmacist

This change does not affect applications lodged prior to 1pm on 5 April 2017. Applications for these occupations lodged after this time will be refused if applying for high points or chain migration nomination.

If you could like to discuss these changes and how it may effect you please Contact Us.