Australian immigration changes – new visas and their impact on Australian immigration

The Temporary Skilled Shortage (TSS) visa (Subclass 482), the effect on GSM visas and the Global Talent Visa scheme

A lot has been happening in Australian immigration in 2018. It has started with the skilled list for the Subclass 189 being amended. Some of the states & territories followed and their Subclass 190 & 489 visas have consequently been effected.

Most significant of all is that as fo 18th March, 2018 the Temporary Work (Skilled) Subclass 457 visa has been replaced by the  Temporary Skilled Shortage (TSS) visa (Subclass 482).

The changes and differences between the Subclass 457 & Subclass 482 are significant. We wont attempt to address them all here but will highlight some key points and how these changes may effect your plans and reinforce the importance of the General Skilled Migration (GSM) visa program.

GSM Visa program

The GSM program has remained intact. It significance is shown by the figures below:

  1.  Subclass 189: 176 occupations remain eligible for this visa
  2. Subclass 190: 416 skilled occupations remain eligible for this visa program
  3.  Subclass 489:
    • 475 skilled occupations remain eligible for the State Territory nominated 489 visa program OR
    • 176 occupations remain eligible for the Family Nominated 489 visa programme

Temporary Employer sponsored visas – new Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa (subclass 482) 

As mentioned the temporary Employer Sponsored visa (Subclass 457) has been replaced by the Temporary Skill Shortage (TSS) visa (subclass 482).

Whilst the Subclass 457 could be granted up to 4 years, the Subclass 482 visas can vary:

  1. Short term – up to 2 years if the occupation is on Short Term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL)
  2. Medium term – up to 4 years if on Medium Long Term Skilled Shortages List (MLTSSL) and a new Regional Occupation List (ROL)
  3. Labour Agreement Stream – this is where an employer has negotiated visa arrangements with the Department of Home Affairs (formerly the DIBP Department of Immigration & B0order Patrol).

Applicant requirements:

  • Work experience – Applicants must have a minimum of 2 years
  • English Language – Applicants must meet minimum english language requirements. e.g For an IELTS test they must score 5 overall, but have a minimum score of at least 4.5 on each component
  • Police clearances – Mandatory police clearances.

Sponsor/Employers:

  • Labour-market testing is required (e.g prescribed advertising standards must be met by the employer)
  • Applicant must be nominated in one of the 509 skilled occupations, unless the negotiated Labour Agreement allows otherwise.

Transitional arrangements – Individuals who are already in Australia on a Subclass 457 visa and need to renew this visa or apply for another visa (such as the Subclass 482 or a permanent visa – see below) will need to check with their employer or Migration Agent what their options are. 

Permanent Employer Sponsored visa – Employer Nomination Scheme (ENS) Subclass 186 visa & Regional Skilled Migration Scheme (RSMS) Subclass 187 visa

  • Applicants must be under 45
  • Applicants must have worked in Australia for 3 years (it was 2 years) on a 457 visa or 482 visa OR have undertaken a skills assessment under the Direct Entry Scheme
  • Applicants must have at least 3 years work experience
  • Applicants occupation must be on the:
    • MLTSSL for Subclass 186 visas (208 occupations)
    • MLTSSL or ROL list for Subclass 187 (673 occupations)

What are the key takeaways about these changes?

  •  It is more difficult to obtain a visa for Australia under both employer nomination schemes –  temporary and permanent residence. e.g Labour Market testing is required for almost all applications under the TSS visa. This wasn’t the case previously.
  • Students hoping to transfer onto an employer sponsored visa must have at least 2 years experience in the occupation for a temporary visa, or 3 years for a permanent employer visa.
  • Skilled applicants wanting to obtain permanent residency need to be under 45 years – unless some very limited exemptions are met.
  • If an applicant or their spouse is eligible for a GSM visa – 189/190/489 – then it is likely to be their best long term option to migrate to Australia permanently

Final comments

These changes have been a long time coming and even before the details were laid out, they have been widely criticised by the business community. They see this as as a significant disadvantage to recruiting, employing and incentivising skilled migrants to fill positions in Australia.

With this is mind, employers will be forced to look closer at the Australia employment market to fill their workforce needs. This will advantage applicants who hold a GSM visa or intend to apply for a GSM visa.

Global Talent Scheme 

In addition to the above there will be further changes to the Australian immigration program. The Department of Home Affairs have flagged a new scheme known as the Global Talent Scheme. This is a  pilot programme aimed at attracting high-income employees and tech specialists.  It is hoped it will alleviate some of the concerns from employers in Australia that they will miss out of skills need to grow their business due to the restrictions in the new Subclass 482 visa.

It will allow eligible established business and start-up companies seeking talent in STEM fields like biomedicine and agricultural technology to sponsor foreign nationals on a temporary residency basis, as well as offering a pathway to permanent residency. The scheme is due to commence on 1st July. As details emerge we will release them here.

 

If you would like to discuss your options – whether you would be eligible –  then please  Contact Us.

 

NSW Skilled Occupation List (SOL) update

The NSW Department of Industry have updated their Skilled Occupation Lists (SOL) effective immediately (25th September, 2017). This update includes both the addition and removal of some occupations.

Applicants seeking to nominated by NSW for a Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) visa or Skilled Regional (Provisional) (Subclass 489) visa will need to have an occupation on their skilled occupations lists.

NSW – The Premier state

Some of these occupations are able to be nominated under both visa programs, whilst many are also listed for nomination in specific regions of NSW for the Subclass 489 visa.

Occupations added:

  • Chemical Engineer (233111)
  • Electronics Engineer (233411)
  • Industrial Engineer (233511)
  • Production or Plant Engineer (233513)
  • ICT Security Specialist (262112)
  • Architectural Draftsperson (312111)
  • Stonemason (331112)

Occupations removed:

  • Occupational Health & Safety Adviser (251312)
  • Cardiothoracic Surgeon (253512)
  • Neurosurgeon (252513)

The full list of occupations can be found here – Skilled Occupations (2017-18).

If you would like to discuss your options for a NSW nominated visa – whether you would be eligible for the Subclass 190 or 489 visa. then please  Contact Us.

Australian skilled migration overview

Australian skilled migration overview

Migration is a part of life in every nation: people are consistently looking for something new and want to have different cultural experiences, and the opportunity to  share their knowledge and skills.

Australia is considered to be a land of unpredictable and wonderful nature, as well as a great place for job opportunities in a number of industries and professions. It is known as “the Land Down Under”. It annually attracts hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world, a significant number who want stay permanently.

In order to stay permanently applicants need to stay on top of the visa requirements and legislation. Immigration legislation is always changing and not everyone can get a visa for the Great Southern Land. Applicants primarily need to have the right education and job skills.

There are two predominant ways of getting a visa for Australia.

To apply for a Skilled Independent (Subclass 189) visa under the General Skilled Migration Visa program, applicants need to review the Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) and confirm if their occupation is available for nomination. There is also a points test, based on a number of different factors.

If you are not eligible for a Skilled Independent (Subclass 189) visa then you can look at alternate GSM visas. These visas are state or territory nominated visas. They include both a permanent residency option – Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) visa – and a temporary residency option – Skilled regional (Subclass 489) visa. You will need to confirm if your occupation is on the the Medium and Long-term Strategic Skills List (MLTSSL) or the  Short-term Skilled Occupation List (STSOL). You will then need to to check if a state or territory will nominate your occupation, and whether you fir that criteria.

If an applicant is not eligible for a GSM visa, they can look at employer sponsored visa opportunities. Applicants who are offered a job in Australia may be eligible for either a temporary or permanent residency employer sponsored visa. The most common employer sponsored visas are the Temporary Work (Skilled) Subclass 457 visa and the Employer Nomination Scheme visa (Subclass 186) visa.

A job offer can also assist with a GSM visa. Either, by being able to claim additional points for skilled employment experience in Australia, or to be eligible to be nominated for a state  or territory visa such as the Subclass 190 or Subclass 489.

In practical terms, if you are skilled professional and are specific in where you want to live e.g. Architect Jobs in Brisbane, you may find a genuine opportunity that you are eligible for. With a willing employer offering you a job, you may initially be sponsored for a Temporary Work (Skilled) Subclass 457 visa. Which may may then lead on to the permanent employer  sponsored  Subclass 186 visa, or a GSM option.

There are various employment websites that can help you find job in Australia, either before you migrate or once you have your visa. Rulla.com is one of those. Non Australian residents, as well as Australian visa holders, can look at websites such as Rulla to see if there are employment opportunities in the field and location that they desire.

If you can determine on the basis of your skills and education what visa you are eligible for, and where you want to do it, this will help you create the life you want in Australia.

General Skilled Migration (GSM): 2017-18 skilled occupations lists

Australian skilled visas – Removed occupations from 1st July 2017

List of removed occupations

In the first of a number of blogs posts discussing the 1st July 2017 changes, please see below details of the occupations removed as an eligible skilled occupation.

Skilled Migration

Occupations entirely removed from the list of eligible skilled occupations on 1 July 2017 are listed below. Nine of these were eligible for 457 and 186 visas on 19 April 2017.

Equipment Hire Manager^149915
Fleet Manager^149411
Picture Framer^394212
Property Manager^612112
Psychotherapist^272314
Real Estate Agent Principal^612113
Real Estate Agent^612114
Real Estate Agent Representative^612115
Ship’s Engineer231212
Ship’s Master231213
Ship’s Officer231214
University Tutor^242112

If this affects your eligibility, and you would like to discuss if have alternative options then please Contact Us.

 

Australian visa fees to increase as of 1st July, 2017

The Australian treasure Scott Morrison, in the annual budget last week, has announced that as of 1st July, 2017 all Australian visa application fees will increase.

The fees will increase in line with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) and be rounded to the nearest $5. The increases for the common visas that we deal with at Cargil Migration are below (all in AUD):

Business skills

  • Business Innovation Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Investor E Stream (Subclass 188) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $4,780 –> $4,875
    • Adult Dependent increase from $2,390 –> $2,440
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,195 –> $1,220
  • Business Talent (Subclass 132) visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $6,990 –> $7,130
    • Adult Dependent increase from $3,495 –> $3,565
    • Child Dependent increase from $1,745 –> $1,780

Work (Skilled) – Subclass 457 program (due to close in March 2018)

  • Subclass 457 visa
    • Primary Applicant increase from $1,060 –> $1,180
    • Adult Dependent increase from $1,060 –> $1,080
    • Child Dependent increase from $265 –> $270

Other temporary work visas

The temporary work visas include:

  1. Temporary Work  Short Stay Specialist (Subclass 400) visa
  2. Temporary Work Domestic Worker (Subclass 403) visa
  3. Temporary Work Foreign Government (Subclass 403) visa
  4. Temporary Work Government Agreement (Subclass 400) visa
  5. Temporary Work Seasonal Worker (Subclass 403) visa
  6. Temporary Activity Visa All Streams (Subclass 408) visa

The increase across all three listed visas are:

  • Primary Applicant increase from $275 –> $280
  • Adult Dependent where applicable increase from $275 –> $280
  • Child Dependent where applicable $70 (no change)

Student visas

  • Student visa (Subclass 500) –
    • Primary Applicant increases from $550 –> $560
    • Adult Dependent increases from $410 –> $420
    • Child Dependent increase from $135 –> $140

Partner & Prospective Spouse visas

  • Partner Visa (Subclass 309/100) – Primary Applicant increases from $6,865 –> $7,000
  • Partner Visa (Subclass 820/801) – Primary Applicant increase from $6,865 –> $7,000
  • Prospective Spouse (Subclass 300) – Primary Applicant increase from $6,865 –> $7,000
  • Partner Visa (820/801) if a holder of Subclass 300 visa – Primary Applicant increase from $1,145 –> $ 1,170

Child visa

  • Child Visa (Subclass 101 & 802) – Primary Applicant increase from $2,370 to $2,415

General Skilled Migration (GSM) visas

The GSM Visas include:

  1. Skilled Independent (Subclass 189) visa
  2. Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) visa
  3. Skilled Regional (Subclass 489) visa

The increase across all three listed visas are:

  • Primary Applicant increase from $3,600 –> $3,670
  • Adult Dependent increase from $1,800 –> $1,835
  • Child Dependent increase from $900 –> $920

Resident Return visas

  • Subclass 155 & 157 Primary Applicant increases from $360 –> $365
  • Subclass 159 Provisional Resident Return
    • Primary Applicant increases from $185 –> $190
    • Adult Dependent $95 (no change)
    • Child Dependent $45 (no change)

If you have any queries please contact us. These fees are suggested and are subject to change. If the visa you are applying for is not listed please get in touch and we can provide further information.

Changes to Subclass 457 visas, occupation lists and GSM visas

Part 1: Australian innovation and visas – a new visa pathway is needed for overseas start ups

Digital Disrupt(ion) and visas

An interesting story appeared today in the Australian press.

The details are in this press article, however the story focuses on Chris Bailey, who along with an Australian business partner set up a successful and fast growing start up buisness called Disrupt in Sydney. This was before he was deported from Australia for lying about completing his mandatory three month fruit picking stint in order to extend his working holiday visa.

It, again, reinforces the problem that Australia has with innovation and visas. In particular how does the Australian visa program support innovation and start ups. In an increasingly competitive international, innovative and digital world, it forces us to consider:

  • What can help Australia drive young entrepreneurial international talent to the country?
  • Why doesn’t the current visa system support the people we need to accomplish this – be it through skilled visas, employer sponsored visas or the business innovation and investment programs?
business innovation & investment

business innovation & investment

Compliance v vision

Whilst most people are of the view that visa compliance is important to the integrity of the visa system, there comes a time when common sense and vision must prevail. There needs to be a solution for someone willing to put their hand in their pocket – figuratively and/or literally – with what appears to be a track record of starting and managing small innovative businesses.

At present there is no such option available to individuals with this talent. They need to either meet relatively stringent criteria in the business innovation and investment program, usually beyond the means of innovative young business people, or they are lost to Australia before they get there. Alternately they need to be sponsored by a business and be paid a market rate salary for the position that is held. A not insignificant cost for any business, let alone one at the start of their journey.

A new visa pathway is needed

So what’s the solution? At this point in time it is difficult to outline a complete visa solution. However a temporary residency visa that encourages people with a combination of the below could be considered.

  • proven entrepreneurial skills or start up activity (as manager or director)
  • college or university training in a technology/digital/computer science/design/engineering course
  • proficient english language skills
  • evidence of sufficient assets or nomination by an Australian resident/citizen business owner/director or support from a federal or state/territory authority
  • adequate health cover

As a follow up to this visa there should be a clear pathway to permanent residency, or a visa extension if the start up is tracking well. This should not be done at the expense of those business people and investors who meet the current criteria, however it should be incorporated into the overall program.

Unfortunatley it would not help Chris, but it could provide a catalyst for the next Chris to find a way to get to Australia and either stay, or leave a legacy for locals to continue with.

Disrupt have also commented on it as well via Linkedin.

Should I apply for an employer sponsored visa or an australian skilled visa?

When I get queries about Australian skilled visas I often get asked whether they should apply for an employer sponsored visa or an Australian skilled independent visa. For some, because of their occupation, they only can get a visa through a job offer. For others they can look at both.

I have touched on some of these issues in other blogs that I have written however the purpose of this blog is to look at some of the issues in a bit more detail.

Decisions

Should I apply for an Employer Sponsored Visa or a General Skilled Migration (GSM) visa?

To provide a framework for the points I have raised, when discussing Employer Sponsored Visas this will include:

  • Temporary residents (Subclass 457) Work visa
  • Permanent residents (Subclass 186) Employer Nomination Scheme visa.

When referring to skilled independent visa this will include the following General Skilled Migration (GSM) visas:

  • Permanent residents Skilled Independent (Subclass 189) visa
  • Permanent residents Skilled Nominated (Subclass 190) visa
  • Temporary residents Skilled Regional (Subclass 489) visa

Visa costs

Whether applying for a skilled independent visa or an employer sponsored visa there are some costs involved. If you are applying for a skilled independent visa these costs are up to you.

When applying for a temporary employer sponsored visa, the Subclass 457 visa, the fees are usually borne by the employer. In fact employers are obligated to not pass on the visa costs to you.

However this applies only for the subclass 457 visa so if you want to obtain a permanent residents visa (which gives you the right to stay) then you generally need to look at an independent visa or a employer sponsored visa like the Subclass 186.

If you apply for the Subclass 186 visa then there are no restrictions from employers to pass the costs onto you. It is however common for employers to at least share or pay these costs. However to avoid employees leaving their employment as soon as their permanent residency is approved they usually ask the employee to sign an agreement that means costs of the visa and the migration agent/lawyer fees will be clawed back if you leave within a period of time. This is often a two year period.

Healthcare

Skilled independent visas and permanent employer sponsored Subclass 186 visas enable the applicants to be covered under Medicare, which gives you access to the Australian healthcare system.

On a temporary residents Subclass 457 visa you and your family are required to hold private health cover as an ongoing condition of your visa. Although the responsibility is for you to maintain this, some employers will offer support and may actually provide this to you.

Education

For people who hold a skilled independent visa or a permanent employer sponsored visa your children will be eligible to enrol in the public school system.

If you are in Australia on a temporary employer sponsored Subclass 457 visa then you may be required to pay fees for children to attend public school. This however will be dependent upon the state that you live in. Employers may be willing to assist with paying school fees but as a starting point it is important to understand what the policy is in the the state that you intend to live and work in.

Work rights

As the holder of a skilled independent visa the main applicant is not restricted in who they can work for, or where they do it. However for the Subclass 190 visa or Subclass 489 these are granted on the basis of living in a particular state that has a need for your skills or because you have relations in that state or region. It is important that you understand the terms of your nomination or sponsorship and adhere to these.

If you have a permanent employer sponsored Subclass 186 visa then there are no restrictions as such to what you do. However as mentioned the employer may ask for fees to be repaid should you leave within a specified period of time.

If you are granted a Subclass 457 visa then the key condition is that you must remain employed with that sponsoring employer. Otherwise you are in breach of your visa and either need to leave the country or make arrangements to apply for another visa to allow you to stay.

Spouse work rights

Under all visas detailed here your partner has work rights.

Location

Under the Subclass 457 visa you are sponsored to work in a particular role for a particular employer in a specific location. You must ensure, along with your employer, that this remains the case. Otherwise you will need to make alternate arrangements to change the conditions of your visa. The permanent employer sponsored subclass 186 visa will not restrict your location, notwithstanding the issues detailed previously.

As mentioned previously in the skilled independent visas available the Subclass 190 and 489 will restrict you to working in a particular location unlike the Subclass 189. To change location without seeking the appropriate authorisation may effect your current visa or your pathway to permanent residency if you have a Subclass 489 visa.

Social Security

In most cases, aside from Medicare coverage. social security benefits are generally available only to permanent residents who have resided in Australia for at least 2 years.

Pathways to Citizenship 

I will address this on two levels. A child will be an Australian citizen if they are born in Australia and either one of their parents is an Australian permanent residents or citizen at their time of their birth.

Otherwise, like everyone else, to become a citizen you need to hold a permanent residents visa for at least 12 months as well as having held an appropriate visa for at least 4 years (this could include a Subclass 457 visa) before you are eligible.

Timescales

The timescales for all of these visa can vary greatly. To be granted a subclass 457 is usually the quickest way to obtain the right to work and live in Australia, however it is the permanent residency visa that will allow you to stay in the long term and depending on which one of the numerous pathways the you take it can be difficult to be certain of timescales.

What should you do?

If you have options then this is completely up to you. However a skilled independent visa (notably the Subclass 189 visa), as I have written about previously, is certainly the best option.

If you however any questions, or further areas you would like me to address, please let me know and I will be happy to answer them. mark@cargilmigration.com

Ticket to the World – Australian visa options

I recently had an opportunity to write an article for @TeamPlayer360, a monthly newspaper covering Recruitment, Jobs, HR and Careers distributed across Edinburgh and London. The article has recently been published and is reproduced below.

The article provides an overview of Australian visa options for skilled professionals, businesses and investors.

Australian visa options

Australian immigration

Ticket to the World: Australian visa options for individuals & businesses

In a word of increasing skilled shortages, your qualifications and skills can be a ticket to see the world. This is especially so when it comes to working or migrating to Australia.

Whilst modern Australia was built on a combination of both skilled workers and unskilled labour – the majority of which were people on a one way ticket from the UK, Ireland and Europe – this is not the case anymore.

The focus is now well and truly on skilled individuals. Individuals who are qualified and have experience in high demand occupations such as engineering, healthcare, information technology, trades, accounting and professional services. It is no coincidence that these occupations remain in high demand around the world and it is these professions that are driving an increasingly global mobile workforce.

However if you fall outside these high demand occupations this does not necessarily rule you out completely as Australia has a myriad of visa options. If you have some qualifications and professional experience it may be just about assessing yourself against the options, and then putting into place the pieces of jigsaw to get the result you are after.

For the lucky few the golden ticket is usually being eligible for a skilled independent visas. Skilled independent visas are, in general, for people under 50 years old and work in one of the occupations above. These visas allow an individual and their family to arrive as permanent residents – the stepping stone to Australia citizen – and to access great majority of public services that Australians can such as healthcare and schools. And there is not even an requirement that you need to work in the skill that got you there.

For those that fall outside the skilled independent options, the past decade has seen an increasing focus on the States and Territories of Australia having a greater say on would be migrants. They are given some degree of autonomy to attract people with skills that aren’t necessarily in shortage nationally but are specifically in their state or regional area within. So while there may be little opportunity for people in occupations in your desired city, there may be elsewhere.

Close relations in Australia – siblings, Parents, Uncles/Aunty’s, Parents – can also in some circumstances have a positive effect on a visa application. This family support can often be the difference between moving there or not.

When none of the above fits your circumstances there may be opportunities for you through employer sponsored visas. When a recruiter picks up the phone to speak to you about roles in Australia, it is usually on one of these visas that they will you be employed. Employer Sponsored visas allows for skilled individuals to obtain work visas as long as you remain with that employer. So while it does come at the cost of some flexibility, compared to the independent visas it also often comes with the advantage of an income upon arrival. There are also other benefits that may be added – primarily depending on human resources policy – such as housing, relocation, annual return flights home and other incentives. Whilst the heady days of benefits that were handed out pre GFC no longer exist anything offered can be the difference between going or staying. At this stage understanding the tax ramifications of accepting an offer, both home and abroad is imperative. Although as this is an expensive business there may be clawback arrangements in place to repay some costs should you leave employment within a specified period of time.

Whilst employer sponsored visa are usually a temporary residency option it often a pathway to permanent residency. Whilst accurate figures are hard to find it is often suggested that 80% progress to permanent residency. This shows the appeal of a strong economy and an enviable lifestyle. It is also a reflection of the trend of successive governments supporting employer sponsored migration.

For anyone who falls short of meeting any of the above visa there may be some alternate options. The working holiday program allows most EU citizens under 31 to experience 12-24 months working in Australia. Whilst this can be the great backpacking adventure of a life, it can also provide opportunities to experience living and undertaking work in Australia and can then lead onto other visas such as employer sponsored visas or even partner visas. It remains the ultimate try before you buy option.

Finally, where all else fails, there are significant advantages offered to those who may want to stay permanently in Australia if they undertake study in a recognised skill shortage area. This is best reflected by the fact that Australia has the 4th largest market in the world for foreign students in tertiary education.

However it is not all about skilled individuals and employees. For successful investors or business owners that desire to relocate permanently to Australia, there are pathways via the business skills program. This program allows innovative and entrepreneurial people to either set up or buy a business or make investments in approved funds or businesses.

Finally for those business owners looking to expand their business or to service new contracts in Australia there are pathways for you to facilitate this and to offer your employees an opportunity to change their life. The criteria for this is not always straight forward and involves compliance with a wide range of law – covering corporate, tax and employment law to name a few – however they allow a business to establish themselves from the beginning with the right foundations for long term success. There have also been concessions made for contract and project workers to enter into the country for work. A reflection of the growth and significance of the resources boom that has helped Australia to not have a recession in 23 years. The only developed country in the world to claim this.

So whether it is permanently or temporarily those people with the the right skills or desire can usually find a pathway for themselves. It may be easy for some compared to others but with planning and patience and the right advice it is achievable.